Posts Tagged ‘Carnival Cruise Line’

So many times we view corporations as brick and mortar filled with stoic individuals that perform their work robotic style with little care for the human element in their environment. A perception exists of the dollar ruling all decisions and these decisions permeate from the board room to the lower echelons of the corporation. Recently I observed an event that proved this observation to be totally incorrect.
Bonnie and I left for a cruise and were sailing out of New Orleans. The first night we were hit with two misfortunes. It was frigid cold and we had to endure the plunging temperature while sitting outside on the Lido deck watching the second malady of the night; the Saints lost and were eliminated from the playoffs. If that were the only problems encountered, we would be happy.
On the second full day at sea we had left the chill of the arctic plunge behind us and the balmy breezes of the tropical trade winds had us believing that what we had left behind was merely a figment of our imagination. Even the cocky men and women dressed in Minnesota jerseys couldn’t dampen the feeling of bliss. Then we heard the announcement.
“This is the captain”, said a voice with a heavy Italian accent. “We have declared a medical emergency and are turning around to land at Cozumel to deliver the sick passenger.”
The televisions in each stateroom has a channel that shows a map of where we are, our path and speed of the ship. We watched as the ship turned almost 180 degrees and the captain gave it the spurs and headed for the island of Cozumel. I was fortunate to have spent my first year in the Navy on the USS Saratoga, a quit large aircraft carrier. As luck would have it we had our Mediterranean cruise cancelled and we sailed half way around the world and landed in the Philippines. No cost was spared as we cruised the seagoing behemoth at 25 knots. This is 29 MPH. I thought that no civilian ship, especially one the size that we were cruising on, could do anything near 25 knots. I was wrong. The good ship Carnival Dream closed on Cozumel at 25 knots. The captain spared no expense as wide open throttle is burning fuel at a large rate. Also the extra 2 hours going to Cozumel and then back to where we turned around burned a large amount of additional fuel.
After discharging the sick passenger, the captain spared no cost and instead of arriving at Mahogany Bay four hours late, we arrived on time. The captain made the conscious decision to spare no cost to get the passenger into port for treatment and then to increase speed to get his passengers docked in Honduras on time. No stoic stiff collared captain on the bridge of the Dream. Instead a man that put the care of his passengers first.
Another action happened that reinforced the feeling of the good of man. Right after the announcement by the captain the cruise director came on the intercom and asked to keep the sick passenger in our thoughts and “prayers”. Very non-politically correct but very human and very refreshing to have a representative of one of the largest cruise lines in the world ask for prayers.
When the ship landed in Cozumel the port authority was there to assist with the transfer of the patient. Once the patient has been transferred to an ambulance and the ambulance leaves the port, the Mexican port authority is no longer responsible. An official from the port went to the hospital and remained at the hospital at the side of the family the majority of the time they were there. Despite barbs being thrown between the United States and Mexico, the human element interceded and the need for comfort and support surpassed politics.
I passed the cruise director as we were disembarking in New Orleans. He was responsible for offloading activities and had to insure that 3,500 passengers got off the ship as quickly and as safely as possible and then be ready to sail with a full ship in six hours. He had not heard what had happened to the patient. As I passed him I told him that the patient was taken off of life support. Then I watched as he grasped my hand in both of his and with eyes turning red and swelling with tears he thanked me for the information. Quit a human trait.
This was a nice trip but I took far more away from it than the tropical bliss. Thoughts and prayers are with the family of Annice Bayles McCallum, a friend, schoolmate and graduate of Farmerville Hi.

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